WELCOME!


We are the Bundaberg Orpheus Singers, Queensland, Australia.
We love singing good music together for our own enjoyment and the enjoyment of others.
We welcome singers aged 18 to 80+.
We meet for practice on Monday evenings at 7.00 pm in the McNaught Hall of the Bundaberg Uniting Church, 34 Barolin Street, Bundaberg.
AND .......
We need more men!! Particularly tenors. Now is the time to come along and sing along. You know you want to.


Wednesday, 1 October 2014

And did you see "Our Emily" on Channel Seven News tonight?

Emily Peddlesden, former Savvi voce and Orpheus singer, now a student at the Conservatorium in Brisbane, was interviewed about her role in the Floods opera presentation .

"Inspired by the courage and resilience of those who lived through the devastating Brisbane flood of 2011 which saw three quarters of Queensland declared a disaster zone, this Queensland Conservatorium contemporary opera commission is an homage to the triumph of human nature in the face of adversity."

Floods will be performed at the Moncrieff Theatre on

Saturday evening, 4th October.  


Emily is the youngest performer to be included in this 

four part operatic presentation. 

Congratulations Emily!  Orpheus is proud of you!


Orphean Leonie Egan on a crusade for Our Glad

Below is the page from the Bargara  Buzz:


And in an interview on the ABC regional radio on Tuesday morning, (30th September)  Leonie explained her desire to see much more acknowledgement of Gladys Moncrieff in the Bundaberg region.  Bundaberg is missing an opportunity of honour Our Glad and to attract interest in her home town. 


Monday, 29 September 2014

When we sing together, 
our hearts beat in unison.

 EKG of loveEKG of love

We who sing in choirs have always known this, haven't we? 
Just as we know that singing together is good for our brains, our emotional health, and any number of other positives in our lives. 

But now, Science has caught up with us!  
(Yay!  Well done, Science!)

The story has been reported in a wide range of media, scientific and social, including our own very dear Aunty ABC.

Here is the original research report - well the synopsis, with the option to read the whole thing if you are strong of heart - no pun intended. 


ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

Front. Psychol., 09 July 2013 | doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00334

Music structure determines heart rate 

variability of singers

Björn Vickhoff1*, Helge Malmgren2Rickard Åström3Gunnar Nyberg4,
Seth-Reino Ekström5, Mathias Engwall6Johan Snygg7Michael Nilsson1,8
and Rebecka Jörnsten9
Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may
 be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration, which may
 in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV)
to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA).
This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect,
 and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more
marked during slow-paced breathing  and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below).
In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing,
affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of
healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to;
(1) hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to;
(2) sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and
(3) sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases.
Heart rate (HR) is measured continuously during the study.
The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure.
In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1–3).
We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR,
respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature.
We show how song structure, respiration and HR are connected.
Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers
accelerate and decelerate simultaneously.
Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the
 question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior.

Sunday, 28 September 2014


Now, This IS Interesting!

Here is a picture from the Stats page about this Blog, relating to the last month of viewing: 


It is very gratifying to know that people from all over the world are looking at our blog.  But what about the people of Bundaberg?  They are of course the ones making up the 329 from Australia, but there are many more from elsewhere.

Challenge: 
Get the word out!  
Bundaberg has to do Better than Elsewhere!