WELCOME!


We are the

Bundaberg Orpheus Singers, Queensland, Australia.

We love singing good music together for our own enjoyment and the enjoyment of others.
We welcome singers aged 18 to 80+.
We meet for practice on Monday evenings at 7.00 pm in the McNaught Hall of the Bundaberg Uniting Church, 24 Barolin Street, Bundaberg.
AND .......
We need more men!! Particularly tenors. Now is the time to come along and sing along. You know you want to.


Saturday, 4 July 2015

The Orpheus Remembers Concerts were a memorable experience!

Audiences appreciated the beautiful music and visuals, reflecting on the impact of war on generations of people everywhere. 


Ciaran Huang-Ryan plays the Last Post

 Children are the victims of war....Do you hear the pray of the children?
 In Flanders Fields, the poppies grow....
Shalom Vocal Ensemble sings Shackleton, the story of the men who survived the Antarctic, only to perish in war.

Tuesday, 16 June 2015

Friday, 12 June 2015


We've had a number of posts to the Orpheus blog about the benefits of music.  
Here is the ultimate accolade:

"Life without music is worthless" from a young person who plays an instrument made of "stuff" recycled from the rubbish tip. 

Here is The Landfill Harmonic Orchestra

Just  Listen to the music they make

And here is one of the instruments, made from an oil can and wood that was thrown away in the garbage. 

Wednesday, 10 June 2015




We are singing the beautiful Benedictus from The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace in the Remembrance Concert. 

This piece was written by Karl Jenkins, commissioned by the Armouries Museum, and was dedicated to the victims of the Kosovo war in 1998-99.

In addition to extracts from the Ordinary of the Mass, the text incorporates words from other religious and historical sources, including the Islamic call to prayer, the Bible (e.g. the Psalms and Revelation), and the Mahabharata. Writers whose words appear in the work include Rudyard Kipling, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and Sankichi Toge, who survived the Hiroshima bombing but died some years later of leukaemia.

Tuesday, 2 June 2015

Prayer of the Children    Kurt Bestor

On the programme at the Remembrance Concert

Kurt Bestor wrote of the song: Over the years, I've written many songs with melodies more memorable, lyrics more poetic, and harmonies richer. But none of my compositions has had the kind of reach and emotional effect of Prayer of the Children. Ironically, I never intended to publish the song at all. I wrote it out of frustration over the horrendous civil war and ethnic cleansing taking place in the former country of Yugoslavia.

Having lived in this now war-torn country back in the late 1970's, I grew to love the people with whom I lived. It didn't matter to me their ethnic origin - Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian - they were all just happy fun people to me and I counted as friends people from each region. Of course, I was always aware of the bigotry and ethnic differences that bubbled just below the surface, but I always hoped that the peace this rich country enjoyed would continue indefinitely. Obviously that didn't happen.
http://kbestor.blogspot.com.au/2005/09/prayer-of-children-story-behind-song.html


In December of 2012, Kurt Bestor dedicated his heartfelt song, "Prayer of the Children" to the children lost in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting on December 14th, 2012



Saturday, 30 May 2015





In Flanders Fields

"In Flanders Fields" is a war poem  written during the First World War by Canadian physician Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae. He was inspired to write it on May 3, 1915, after presiding over the funeral of friend and fellow soldier Alexis Helmer, who died in the Second Battle of Ypres. According to legend, fellow soldiers retrieved the poem after McCrae, initially dissatisfied with his work, discarded it. "In Flanders Fields" was first published on December 8 of that year in the London-based magazine Punch.

It is one of the most popular and most quoted poems from the war. As a result of its immediate popularity, parts of the poem were used in propaganda efforts and appeals to recruit soldiers and raise money selling war bonds.
Its references to the red poppies that grew over the graves of fallen soldiers resulted in the remembrance poppy becoming one of the world's most recognized memorial symbols for soldiers who have died in conflict. 
The poem and poppy are prominent Remembrance Day symbols throughout the Commonwealth of Nations, particularly in Canada, where "In Flanders Fields" is one of the nation's best-known literary works. 



Poppy Wall at Australian War Memorial